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Temple of Hatshepsut

The temple of Hatshepsut is devoted to the Pharaoh Hatshepsut and the god Osiris. Hatshepsut was one of the few female pharaohs and was the most successful of the women pharaohs. Originally she was the regent for her step son, Thutmouse III, but she usurped him and claimed the throne for her own. All the statues and hieroglyphs show her as man wearing the pharaonic kilt and a false beard. By appearing as a man she was asserting her claim to the throne.

The temple is very impressive from far away but up close it's quite damaged (it's a monet! movie, anyone?). After Hatshepsut's death someone tried to erase her from the history records by destroying her monuments and chiselling away the hieroglyphs that referred to her reign. The who and why of the damage is still a mystery. Some Egyptologists believe that it was Thutmouse III. He destroyed the monuments out of resentment because he had to wait so long to be Pharaoh. Others believe that she was erased because a woman had no right to rule and that her reign may be seen as offensive to the gods. Whatever the reason, she almost disappeared from history forever.
Temple of Hatshepsut
Temple of Hatshepsut
Temple of Hatshepsut Destroyed Hierogylphs Temple of Hatshepsut

I think we can sum up our visit to the Temple of Hatshepsut in one word. Hot! The temple is in the middle of the desert. We visited the temple in the mid-morning. Egypt was experiencing a heatwave with temperatures 9 degrees above average. The temperature was in the high 40s. Luckily they have a little train which takes you from the front gate to the temple itself. Any form of excerise in that heat is not very fun.

More photos on Flickr.

Our visit to the Temple of Hatshepsut was part of our Road to Jordan tour. We did a 17-day tour with On The Go to Egypt and Jordan and we had a lot of fun. Other entries from this trip include: More Egyptian Temples (Luxor and Karnak), The Tringles, Wadi Rum, Kom Ombo and Edfu, Feluccan Fun, Abu Simbel and The Dead Sea.

jess - 19th Sep 2009, 15:13 tags: r2j egypt hatshepsut

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